My diocese, my pride. My faith, my heritage

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ST ANNE CATHEDRAL

Yes, my diocese is my pride; my faith, my heritage! So, which is my Diocese and what is my Faith? Well, my Diocese is Ikot Ekpene and my Faith is the Christian and Catholic Faith. So, what makes these my pride and heritage? To answer this, dear friends, I welcome you to this historical tour and expository journey to the diocese called IKOT EKPENE.

Ikot Ekpene Diocese, located in the South Southern part of Nigeria, Africa, was created in 1963 by Pope John XXIII. Precisely, located in Akwa Ibom State, the diocese is one of the suffragan dioceses of the Ecclesiastical Province of Calabar since 1993. The diocese covers an area of 2, 263 square kilometres with a population of about 1,030,896 inhabitants (as at the 2006 census) of which about 80% are Christians and about 10% are Catholics, that is, about 117,609. The Cathedral Church named Saint Anne Cathedral is located along Cardinal Ekandem Avenue in Ikot Ekpene metropolis. The current Bishop, its third, Most Rev. Camillus Raymond Umoh was consecrated and took possession on October 9, 2010.

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A CROSS SECTION OF PRIESTS ON ANNUAL RETREAT

The earliest date for the foundation of any mission Church in Ikot Ekpene was in 1914 by the missionary fathers at Anua, St Anne Station, Ifuho, which is now the Cathedral. It was established in 1918 with Rev. Fathers Paul Biéchy, CSSP, and James Moynagh, SPS, as the first resident priests in 1920 and 1930, respectively, under Bishop Joseph Shanahan – the pioneer Holy Ghost Bishop of Southern Nigeria with his headquarters at Onitsha.

Ikot Ekpene has always been associated with Calabar Mission, which was established when Fr. James Moynagh, SPS, was appointed the Prefect Apostolic on July 9, 1934. When the Prefecture was raised to the status of Vicariate Apostolic on June 13, 1947, the Pastoral Care of the entire territory was entrusted to Bishop James Moynagh who became the Bishop of Calabar Diocese on April 18, 1950.

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BISHOP CAMILLUS RAYMOND UMOH

With the appointment of Bishop Moynagh, SPS, the Holy Ghost Fathers were replaced by the St. Patrick Fathers, who thenceforth have been indeed the Founding Fathers of Evangelization in Calabar, Ogoja, Ikot Ekpene, Port Harcourt and Uyo Dioceses.

The first indigenous Bishop of Ikot Ekpene was the Most Rev. Bishop Dominic I. Ekandem. He was ordained a priest on December 7, 1947, in Ifuho. He was consecrated an Auxiliary Bishop on February 7, 1954, by Bishop Moynagh as the consecrating prelate and Bishops Peter Rogan MHM of Buéa and Paul Biéchy of Brazzaville as co-consecrators. On March 1, 1963, following the creation of the diocese, the Most Rev. Bishop Dominic I. Ekandem was appointed the first resident Bishop of Ikot Ekpene Diocese with the then Civil Provinces of Abak and Ikot Ekpene and all of the Annang ethnic extraction under it.

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A CROSS SECTION OF THE LAITY AT EUCHARISTIC CELEBRATION

Bishop Dominic Ekandem was the Bishop from 1963 to 1989. On October 31, 1971, Most Rev. Bishop Ephraim S. Obot, who later became the Bishop of Idah Diocese in Kogi State (1971-2010), was appointed Auxiliary to Bishop Dominic Ekandem. Under Bishop Dominic Ekandem, Ikot Ekpene Diocese witnessed a tremendous growth in the ordination of indigenous priests. Creation of parishes, establishment of schools and hospitals. He was a Cardinal on April 27, 1976, and his creation in the Consistory as the first Cardinal in Nigeria on May 24, 1976, by Pope Paul VI.

On the appointment of His Eminence Dominic Cardinal Ekandem to the See of Abuja Federal Capital Territory of Nigeria (FCT) in 1989, Most Bishop Camillus A. Etokudoh who was consecrated the Auxiliary Bishop of Ikot Ekpene Diocese on May 14, 1988 became its second Bishop. He was appointed to the See on September 1, 1989 and installed as its second Bishop on February 3, 1990. Following the appointment of Most Rev. Camillus A. Etokudoh as the Catholic Bishop of Port Harcourt Diocese on May 4, 2009, Msgr. Camillus Raymond Umoh was appointed as the Catholic Bishop of Ikot Ekpene on July 16, 2010, to replace Most Rev. Bishop C. A. Etokudoh. He was ordained on October 9, 2010, as the third Bishop of the diocese.

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A CROSS SECTION OF RELIGIOUS AND SEMINARIANS

Over the years, the clergy and lay faithful of the diocese work together for the evangelization of the people of the area. As such there has been a widespread of lay apostolates and evangelism that have seen many converted to the Catholic Faith. In Ikot Ekpene, there is a true, gradual and fruitful inculturation of the Christian Faith into the culture of the people. A diocese created almost along the line of geographic-ethno-politics of the state is predominantly made up of the Annang. The Annang culture is generally a culture of respect, hospitality and creativity. Its people are lively and happy people who are contented with the good gifts nature and God has bestowed on them. They love and appreciate arts, dance, music and foreigners. The Annang is a home for good African delicacies, the palm wine and locally made gin.

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REGINA PACIS AUDITORIUM

Vocation to the catholic priesthood and the religious life has increased over the years. With her catholic schools and the seminaries, there is a well-thought-out formation plan to embrace vocation even from an early age. Still a young diocese with only 56 years of existence she has so much prospects for the future.  The collaboration that exists between its clergy and its laity is a beauty to behold and has facilitated its missionary growth over the years.

As a Spiritual hub of the area, Ikot Ekpene Diocese has a Pastoral Centre named Cardinal Ekandem Pastoral Centre where visitors can find solace and comfort. The Diocese is currently embarking on a Retreat Centre Project which promises to be a Pilgrimage Centre open for all in need of a Spiritual tourism, Spiritual refreshment and rekindling. You can as well be a part of that project by contacting the Project coordinators through the Diocesan Website.

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PRIESTLY ORDINATION

Ikot Ekpene Metropolis is not only home to the Cathedral Church of Saint Anne but there are up to four other Catholic Churches (parishes) within the city to include: St. Vincent de Paul Church (Located along Umuahia Road), St Anne Catholic Church (Located along Essien Road), St Dominic Catholic Church, (Located along Cardinal Ekandem Avenue) and Immaculate Conception Catholic Church (Located Off Uyo Road). These Faith communities are always very welcoming and will be delighted to have you join them in worship and prayers. The Diocesan Secretariat complex is located within the Cathedral Church premises.   

Growing up within the local Church and faith community, attending the various catechism classes and subsequently receiving my baptism, First Holy Communion and Confirmation as well as working in various capacities in the Diocese as a Seminarian, Deacon and now as a Priest, I have come to appreciate my diocese as my pride, my Catholic Faith as my heritage. In Ikot Ekpene Diocese Faith not only becomes action but faith comes alive. For more information please visit the Diocesan Website @ www.ikotekpenediocese.org

Ikot Ekpene Diocese is a community of Faith and LIFE

Valentine Umoh
Priest of the Diocese
Ordained 2014.

 

DO NOT BE AFRAID, NEVER BE DISCOURAGED: IT CAN ONLY GET BETTER!

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Yes, times are hard! “I am not getting younger.” “I have finished secondary school, admission for higher education has become an uphill task.” After NYSC there is no work. There is no money for feeding. “I am the first child, everyone depends on me, while I have nothing substantial doing to meet these cumbersome budgets.” “My Father is well advanced and not working and my Mother is a petty trader with little or no income.” “Those who would have helped me are making demands that I cannot meet: I should join their secret cult (swear an oath of allegiance) or I should be their sex slave before they could help me.” “My uncle or aunt is excessively wealthy (all their children study abroad) but wouldn’t help me nor any of his brother´s or sister´s children.” “I was the best in my high school.” “Those I was better off (at least academically) are making it far in life. Here am I with little or no hope that things will change tomorrow.” “I am getting tired of this life.” God is unjust. The world is wicked.

These are some of the groanings from young promising talents that I have been opportune to have meet by virtue of my life and ministry as a priest. Times are hard, and the society makes it harder. A typical Nigerian youth is intelligent, hardworking and wants to succeed like his peers. He wants to explore. There is an inner zeal in him or her to live his or her dreams. Most Nigerian Youths are very virtuous and as such will not want to succeed via “Get rich quick” means that are easily and readily available. They are knowledgeable enough to know the aftermath of those evil means. In a society where you struggle for everything: food, housing, education, healthcare, a society where there is no social security, the youths feel the impact the most and they find life so hard. Indeed, in Nigeria, life is a real struggle!

In the last two or three months, I have read of so many cases of suicide. 70 % of these cases are youths in their mid-30s. While, I cannot defend nor support this attitude in any way, they are clear expressions of the state of hopelessness and desperation. A society where nothing seems working forces some of her youths to consider suicide as an option. God forbid, we always say but unless you put yourselves in their shoes, you will never understand why anyone will want to take his own life. Is there anyone who doesn’t want to own a house, have a car, eat well at least daily, have the luxury of a good wardrobe, have a comfortable bank account, have a promising career job, get married, have lovely kids, etc? Desperation sets in when these yearnings are far beyond reach and there is no convincing hope that things would change soon. Things gets worse, when you look around and see some of your mates who have started living their dreams. Despair and a sense of worthlessness or ill-luck sets in. If you have found yourself in these situations and these descriptions suits you, it is precisely because of you that I put this up: “Do not be afraid, never be discouraged, it can only get better!”

There is a story I heard of a man with three kids and a lovely wife who met a travelling agent in Lagos to ask him to find any country for him where he can move in with his family. They man said: “ANY COUNTRY OTHER THAN NIGERIA.” He wants to get out, he wants to move away. He is ready to sell the few things he has. He is ready to seek asylum in a country as poor as Gabon. He is ready to abandon his fatherland just to see if he can meet earns meet and secure a better life for his three kids. For him, any country other than Nigeria will be better. Why?

Yes, any country where the basic need of education from primary, secondary and even up to university level is free or at least affordable; any country where healthcare is guaranteed; any country where government know their work; any country where electricity is not a luxury; Any country where a “common” cleaner or gardener is guaranteed the established minimum wage and respect; Any country where the police know their work and do not harass innocent citizens, Any country which allows a man to fulfill his potentials and express himself; Any country where the needs of the poor and common man determines government policies; Any country where traffic rules are observed to the letter; Any country where youths are not condemned to hang around politicians for their daily bread; Any country where human life is valued and respected; Any country which does not become a GIANT in GDP, on economic tabloids and in IMF rating but with the greatest poverty and unemployment rate; Any country where jobs are advertised and employments are based on merit and not on “Who do you know? Or who is your father?” Any country where government workers due for retirement are not afraid to retire because of a never-ending tradition of owing gratuities and pensions; These countries will always be a better country than Nigeria.

Sometimes, it is sad to realize that almost all the countries that fought the second world war, where able to put behind them the ravages of the war to build a strong and solid economic and political structure for the years that followed; these countries have the strongest economies today. Unfortunately, in Nigeria the same issues that led to the civil war had never been overcome to date. The poor masses and the youths become exposed to a high rate of vulnerability and there is a mad rush out of the country to just anywhere better and safer.   

Wait a minute! Do not be afraid, never be discouraged, it can only get better! All hope is not yet lost because there is life. Take life easy and be easy on yourself. You can only do what you can. You are not a magician. Believe in yourself and avoid unnecessary comparisons. The pain of being human is the uncertainties that we must combat with every day. Sometimes we try so hard to predict, pierce or glance into tomorrow (the future) only to find out that we were wrong after all. Take and deep breath and for once congratulate yourself for being where you are at the moment: it can only get better. A flashback at yesterday could encourage you to keep moving for no matter how dark the clouds are there will always be a silver lining in the end. Be filled with more thanksgivings and gratefulness than regrets. Many people you see smiling and taking mouth-watering pictures of themselves and of places they have visited suffer so much pain behind the smiles and the beauty of those pictures you see. What kills people easily today is depression. Depression comes when you put so much pressure on yourself. So, my dear, cheer up, give a smile and keep moving: it can only get better. There is no better encouragement than self-encouragement; there is no better determination than self-determination.

That you tried and fail doesn’t mean you cannot try again. There is no harm in continuous trial. Build yourself, develop yourself, build your self-confidence. Learn from the mistakes of others, never wait until you make them yourself. Read wide and always be updated. We are in the age of social media. So many useful information is now closer to your door steps than before: make a good use of them. I am a strong advocate of a new and better society called Nigeria, but we must stay alive to see this come to reality. Never allow your vulnerability to be exploited by political pundits, aim to build your personal career. Forgive those who have wronged you and live joyfully because tomorrow promises to be a better time.

Valentine Umoh

17.01.2019
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BEFORE OCTOBER ENDS – SOME WEIRD DREAMS

 

Even though there is no perfect society nor country nor continent; I seem unfortunate to be born in a country and continent full of paradoxes. When I wake up to see some smaller countries that cannot even stand the economic and natural/human resource weight of my country, I am tempted to conclude with my friend that “something is wrong with the black man.” From Libya to South Africa, from Senegal to Somalia, the same problems, the same unanswered questions. Children crying and suffering, the poor masses dying of curable diseases, the minority suffering oppression from the majority tribes; Politicians exploiting their own people and exporting the resources of the nation to countries that do not need them, leaving their own people in abject poverty; school systems are dysfunctional, the elites train their children abroad and these will return and continue from where their fathers stopped; the medical systems are not working; when the rich are sick they are flown out for medical treatment. And I asked: How many foreigners are admitted in our hospitals or how many of them study in our own schools? How many of them shift money from their countries to keep safe in our banks?

I am in the prime of my years, after about three decades I am yet to see any significant changes. The same story lines greet us every day. Country men buying guns to kill their fellow countrymen. People establishing prayer houses everyday just to make ends meet and they call it Christianity. Many who cannot stand the frustration are rushing out in their numbers to anywhere other than Nigeria, anywhere outside Africa just to be sure they have not wasted their lives all together. Young people who are fortunate to get into universities graduate in their numbers every year and there is no harmonized system to get them engaged in the industries. Those who work in government establishments swear never to retire; every year they are growing younger instead of older because retirement is no longer honourable. Declaring of age through affidavit has replaced Birth Certificate; WAEC certificate is gradually losing value because even many of those who govern never went to school. Appointments and employments are based on “who you know” and not “what you know.” Education is not oriented to any developmental goals, people just go to school to get “paper certificate” without being “certified” and that is why someone who studied history can comfortably work in the Banks and those who studied accounting work as journalists in the media houses. The easiest and fastest business is to open your own “church”, “miracle centers” or “ritual centers.” This now becomes the industries and the hospitals for the poor man.

The situation can be very annoying and appalling when you see small countries who are not equal to the smallest state in Nigeria fulfilling and satisfying the basic needs of its citizens: Security, Electricity, Education, Health care, Housing and Food security. Where did we go wrong and how did we get here? Is there still hope?  The hope there is seems only a dream.

Elections are here again, people are buying guns from other developed countries (countries who only manufacture guns they cannot use against their fellows) to use to kill their fellow countrymen. Ballot boxes will be hijacked as usual; INEC will count votes incorrectly and announce result that do not represent the will of the people. Many lawyers (supposedly learned men) will be hired to defend election inconsistencies in the court and everything will be settled, and we return to the same zero level waiting for the next four years. No accountability, no transparency. Trillions of dollars are announced as annual budgets, but the poor does not see them. The politicians sign contracts to their own companies and take the commission as well. Children yet unborn have accounts opened for them, yet the living cries for a basic daily bread to feed on. For a nation with a population of about 200 million people this is so sad and pathetic and makes people to ridicule us as the “BIG FAT FOOL.” A country with almost all the mineral resources not given to many countries, with an arable land, and one of the worlds´ best weather cannot be this irresponsible. There is something wrong somewhere! I am tempted to conclude with my friend that “Something is wrong with the black man.” But I don’t want to run into such a pessimism because I the writer I am a black man and there are so many reasonable Africans and Nigerians out there.

A man who has seen three decades is no longer a kid. If he lives to see another four to five decades that is the highest anyone can expect giving the tensed condition of life in my country. So what hope is there that there can be a significant turnaround? After over 50 years, the country is yet to find its compass and blueprint, and many will still blame that on colonialism and military dictatorship? We need a leader not a President! Any one can be a President, very few have been able to show themselves leaders in a country´s moment of crisis.

Be that as it may I still have a dream that someday, one day, may be before I am gone or afterwards, that the confidence in the Nigerian Educational system will be restored. I have a dream of a trustworthy judicial system that will stand independent of political affiliation and whose personnel will be true “priests” in the temple of justice. I have a dream that the electoral process will be restored to what it should be and that citizens can elect their leaders without political intimidation. I have a dream that my country men and women will only travel to foreign countries not to secure the basic needs of life but only for an enriched cultural interaction. I have a dream that merits will determine employments and a culture of true excellence enthroned. I have a dream when politicians will not be able to move a kobo out of public fund for their private use talk less of laundering these funds abroad for a haven. I have a dream that where you come from and what language you speak nor where you worship will not deny the citizens their authentic rights of association. I have a dream that a time will come when education will be a basic need guaranteed by the government to every citizen; a time when medical care will be part of the social security scheme for every citizen; a time when every type of honourable work will be able to provide for a man´s basic needs. I have a dream of a time when a brother will not buy gun or bullets to kill a fellow brother because of election; a time when youths will be gainfully employed and stop following politicians about like housemaids. I have a dream of a time where financial loans will be accessible to those who want to expand their business investment; a time when the country will not depend on imported goods. I have a dream of a time when people from other countries and races will come to receive education through scholarship in Nigeria; a time when visa to Nigeria will be prized like to USA or UK.  A time when a happy retirement will be every workers goal. A time when the economy and politics of Nigeria will be driven by people of high moral and intellectual acumen. A time when there will be a high influx of visitors for the summer break. This is my dream. It may not be realized in my time but one day my children´s children will testify that this dream did come to past.

Before October ends, Nigeria, my country, Africa, my continent, think like a mother, think about your many suffering children who pride themselves in you and wish they could live happily in thee and fulfill their aspirations! The sufferings and wailings of your children out of your shores should remind you that you have not lived up to expectation as a mother. Arise O Africa, Arise O Nigeria be the true mother of your children. Expunge from thee all those evil politicians and policy makers who continue to trade the destiny of your children for their selfish interest. Let them know that Africa is larger than any group of persons and that the destiny of Nigeria far exceeds the greed of few corrupt individuals. Before October ends, Mother Mary, Queen and Patroness of Nigeria, Mother of Africa guard and protect your innocent children as a mother protects her children under your protective arms!

Before October ends… think Nigeria, think Africa!

Valentine Umoh
21.10.2018

I cry for Nigeria, my country!

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Barely few months ago, The Catholic Church in Nigeria protested the killings currently going on in various parts of the country. That same day, some persons were lynched on their return from the mass burial in Benue. Up till today, we are yet to hear or see that some arrests had been made not to mention their prosecution and conviction. Up till date, the President is yet to officially react to that protest neither by words nor body language nor actions. The killings are still on and blood is still flowing unchallenged.

I sat down last night watching Channels TV (News at 10, 23.06.2018) and it was again in the news that several persons were again killed, several other injured and driven away from their homes by the same set of faceless Fulani killer herdsmen. Unfortunately, it happened in the same state were a Chief Judge had earlier sentenced five Christian youths to death for defending themselves and in the process killed some of the herdsmen as they embarked on their routine attacks. Earlier, I had read the pleas for mercy on those five youths by CAN and some concerned citizens notably the Archbishop of Lagos. All these happenstances have not stop putting me at a point of reflection on what is really happening with Nigeria my country.

Blood, blood, and blood everywhere!!! Many are left homeless in their own country. Many children have been left orphans and with little or no future. Many women have seen the slaughtering of their husbands and children in cold blood. No one seems to be interested about the sanctity of human life not to mention the emotional and psychological trauma of those bereaved. Yet the powers that be seems not to be interested. Many are even enriching themselves with the so-called fight against terrorism because large sum of money is signed in every year´s budget for that purpose and those in-charge of the IDPs camps have their own share of the loots. This is Nigeria, my country!  Or is that another way of creating employment?

Blood is sacred! Blood is sacred! And I repeat again blood is sacred! Why do we keep playing politics with everything in this country to the extent of playing politics with human blood? The general conditions of living are very poor, and the life expectancy is reducing everyday yet the few who are trying to survive cannot be assured of their life in peace. A country where human life is threatened everyday has ceased to be a just country. Something is wrong somewhere! My beloved and hitherto peaceful and joyful country has been raped and those who are involved in this blood-sucking conspiracy will not escape the wrath of natural law.

What I cannot understand is what has bewitched the leadership of my country. After the polls my country´s leaders seem to loss focus. Instead of sit-down and strategize on how to address the problems of over 180 million people, they begin campaigning for the next polls which will come in the next four years. In the end, the same people who elected them suffer the consequences of negligence. Lives and properties are lost everyday with no real intention on the part of the leaders to put an end to such menace. There is a general lack of political will. There is no rule of law. In Nigeria, “Might is Right.” Few untouchables become “wolves” to other citizens. So, are you telling me that some citizens have ´more´ right to citizenship than others?  We talked about ´Restructuring´ but the powers that be is not interested because it will not be in the interest of the few untouchables.

For how long my people shall we continue like this? If you criticize them, you are silenced. If you protest, you are called names. If you join them, you are compensated and rewarded. How shall the young remain sinless in this sinful, murderous and adulterous generation? This is no time to sleep; we all must be awake and say NO to the perpetuation of evil in this country. Injustice to one means injustice to all! Unfortunately, I only have one country to call my own. I will not allow blood-suckers to hijack my once beautiful and peaceful country. I must keep fighting for my rights to a happy living in my fatherland! Join me and say NO to bad governance and leadership! Nigeria must be better… Nigeria must be great again!

24.06.2018
Valentine Umoh

THERE IS SOMETHING IN A NAME. BE PROUD OF YOUR NAME!

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If there is any important event for the parents of a new born baby, it is the naming ceremony. At such important ceremony, the father of the child (or whoever is responsible for naming the child) gives the name for which the child is to be known and addressed. Apart from the circumstances of the birth of the child, religion and culture influences the name given to every child at birth. As such, a mere glance at a person´s name, it is easier to determine his or her religion and cultural heritage.

In the Ancient Near East (Israel, Mesopotamia, Egypt and Persia), names were thought to be extremely powerful and act, in some ways, as a separate manifestation of a person or deity. For them, names had metaphysical signification. Right into the Old Testament, the names of individuals are meaningful (every name has a meaning and significance) and a change of name indicated a change of status. Every biblical name had a meaning and biblical characters were given names at birth that reflect something of significance or describe the course of their lives. Varied examples abound.

In the Christian dispensation, new names are given to Christians at Baptism (also at confirmation) to reflect their new Christian status.  With the advent of modern civilization there was a systematization of names. Now at least a person´s official name must contain two names: his own personal name and surname. Both names now consist a person´s identity. The number of names may vary from one culture to another. In all of these, there is nothing as valuable to a person as his name. For instance: “My name is Valentine Umoh.” The first is my baptismal name which have become my first name, personal name and perhaps the most common. The second is my Surname, what is now referred to as Family name. The culture I come from allow us to use our Father´s first name as middle name. In that case my official name becomes: Valentine Anthony Umoh. That is my name and I value it.

I am writing this because I want you to know or to remind you that “there is something in a name; there is beauty in a name.” Be proud of your name! If there is anything we cannot control, it is birth. Birth is a given because life is a given. You do not decide where to be born, or to which culture to be born into, neither to what family nor to which parents. Those are the givens of life. You need to be proud of your religion, family and culture. These are perfectly reflected and engraved in your name.

Yes, there might as well be a case, where a child grows up and feels uncomfortable with the name he or she was given at birth and decides to change it. Well and good! But to whatever name you change into be proud about and live with it. There is something in a name.

I find the current trend of people twisting the spellings of their names or preferring some school nicknames to their real names quite unfortunate. For me, it shows the lack of understanding of the metaphysical undertones behind the giving of names. You can find this readily on Facebook and other social media. It is a trend that needs to be checked, if not we will lose something as valuable as personal identity which in this case is represented by names.

Your name is the most important aspect of your self-identity, self-image and self-esteem. I am tempted to suppose that those who twist or change their names on Social Media like Facebook are either Fraudsters, scammers or they have a false sense of identity, low-self esteem or inferiority complex. So, are you ashamed to let people know that your surname is ASUQUO, ETIM, OKON, UKOHA, UMEH or ABUBAKAR? What are you ashamed of? Your religion, your family, your language or ethnicity or culture? That is too bad. You know what? You can´t really change that, so you got to live with it. Attempting to change that by twisting the spelling of your name or preferring your nickname is like living a false life. Be proud of your name. Let the world know that is your name. Or are you afraid of the world? Then you better not be born at all.

Changing your name to: Psquare, TuFace, Shakira, Beyonce, Neymar, Ronaldo, Messi, Suarez, Baby, Sugar, Noble, Princess, Buhari, Saraki etc doesn’t really change your metaphysical composition neither does it change your true identity as that Oron girl, Annang boy, Igbo girl, Tiv girl, Hausa boy, etc. It only reflects that you are suffering from a false sense of selfhood and personhood! Those models have made their names and written their names on the signs of times. They didn’t borrow your name, they used theirs. Try to also use your name and make it known (popular if you like). If you are not proud of your name, no one will! If you don’t make it known, no one will! Don’t forget that your name is your identity.

One last note. The last time I checked English adjectives do not qualify as proper names of persons (Anthroponym), they are always Proper nouns. This is a reminder to those who add: sweet, hot, sexy, noble, etc to their names. These are adjectives which also could be used as complements and not as names of persons. Again! What name is there in your international passport, voters card, National ID, WAEC certificate and Baptism Card? Those are your true identity in case you have forgotten. Let those names reflect on your social media platforms and be proud of your name. There is something in a name, do not change or twist the spelling of your name for nothing, nor trade your true identity for what is trending. What is trending doesn’t last: Your true identity is your identity. Learn to value what you have. Value your name and make it known.  

“A person who can´t be proud of his or her name and age is living a false life!”

14.06.2018
Valentine Umoh

WHY ARE WE STILL PLAYING POLITICS WITH ELECTRICITY?

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Statista.com “Ranking of the countries with the highest quality of electricity supply in 2017/18 writes: “In today´s culture, many people cannot imagine life without electricity. It has become a global necessity and a part of the everyday life of many people. Life without electricity is almost impossible – it can be difficult and slow. The importance of electricity can be seen throughout various fields of human activity: engineering, communication and transport, entertainment, and surgery…”

Ricardo Falcon on June 26, 2015 in an article titled “How can Africa develop its electricity infrastructure?” writes: “Little is as critical for economic progress as a reliable electricity supply. In Africa, the lack thereof has taken a heavy toll on regional integration, productivity and competitiveness.”

On March 11, 2016 CNBC Africa reported that “Only four in 10 Africans have access to a reliable power supply, according to a survey by Afrobarometer.” The report uses Nigeria as an example and reads: “In a striking example, 96 per cent of Nigerians are connected, but only 18 per cent of those connections work “most of the time” or “always.”

Yomi Kazeem on April 19, 2016 drew up a comparative analysis showing the percentage population with access to electricity, population rate connected to a national grid and the share of these connections with stable and reliable power in Africa using the data provided by Afrobarometer. He concluded: “These charts show reliable electricity is still a luxury for more than half of Africa.” According to the charts, countries like Mauritius have 100 % of the population connected to national grid and a corresponding 100 % of these connections have reliable power. Again, South Africa have about 96 per cent connected and more than 80 per cent with reliable power. However, Nigeria has an access rate of 90% and a connection rate of 96% but a low reliable power supply rate of 18%. So, how did countries like Mauritius and South Africa achieve their electric power stability and reliability? And why is so hard for this supposed ´giant of Africa´ (Nigeria) to follow suit. Are we also playing politics with this necessity of human life?

It is very sad, offensive and annoying to read that “more than a century after the intervention of the light bulb, a majority of Africans are still in the dark, either intermittently or constantly” and the CNN or World Bank reports which confirms that “The 48 countries of Sub-Saharan Africa (with a combined population of 800 million) generate roughly the same amount of power as Spain (with a population of 45 million). As embarrassing as these reports are but reality is upon us.

While these same reports acknowledge that “there are signs of improvements” because Renewable energy investments are on the rise, these reports note that “hydropower has a huge unlocked potential: while it already represents one fifth of the overall production, only 10 percent of the estimated potential is being utilized.” And now my question: what is hindering the utilization and unlocking of the potential of hydropower for which I know Nigeria is blessed with? What about the solar energy? Is it that we lack the manpower or the technical know-how about these things? Or is it about money? How much do our political office holders run away with in the name of salaries and allowances? And what is the need for excessive foreign reserves without meeting these bare needs? If we could employ Julius Berger and other foreign companies to build our roads and bridges, can´t we employ a foreign energy generation company to help us generate and manage electric power? Even if we lacked the money, can´t we borrow to facilitate this, if we could borrow to pay salaries? Let it not be what I am thinking, that we are playing politics with a basic need like electric power generation and supply in this country.

Just imagine the embarrassments. Due to the lack of reliable electric power supply, Nigeria with over 200 million population has become the dumping ground for all types and brands of generators from China, Japan and other Asian countries. An average Nigerian owns a generator even if it is the so-called “I better pass my neighbour.” Yet every day we talk about creating employment opportunities, we discuss about improving the economy. We discuss about improving education, the health sector etc.  How can this be possible without reliable electricity? For instance, energy can facilitate the development of schools, and help teachers gain access to a wide variety of teaching mechanisms especially in this computer age. There is no short cut if we must realize these. The simple key is a reliable electricity. This is the key. In this 21st century and the growing impact and indispensability of the cyberspace, just point out to me any aspect of the economy and human life that doesn’t require electricity. I tell you, there is none!

It is time, our leaders become proactive and stop playing politics! They should collectively find ways of solving our electricity problems. But come to think of it, how much will this cost? What did it cost Mauritius, Egypt, Tunisia and South Africa? For me, it cost nothing but the political will and the determination to achieve this. We should start thinking of the good of this country than our individual pockets, if not posterity will not forgive us. Please help me tell our leaders to stop playing politics with electric power generation: We need stable and reliable electricity in this country! It is not a luxury rather a basic need.

11.06.2018
Valentine Umoh